Saturday, May 2, 2009

Meeting Sarah...

My vacation is over but just in a short week, I've done a million things! I want to continue updating you on Sandy and I's travels while she was down here visiting. In 6 days, I put over 1200 miles on my car! That meant A LOT of thrift stores & antique stores!

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On Tuesday, Sandy and I blew into New Roads like a hurricane and took over sweet little Sarah and her beautiful little town.

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This was the first time we met Sarah in person. (She was the gracious hostess of the Pink & Green Swap last month) I hope we didn't blow her mind! A yankee from PA and a coon ass from the bayou can sometimes be a little overwhelming when hanging out together.

Sarah, I hope you haven't deleted my phone number from your cell phone as I hope we are still friends! tee hee)

Sarah lives on the water in the cutest little cottage. Now I understand why she calls herself a little mermaid!!!

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We wanted to go visit The Myrtles Plantation in nearby St. Francisville but the ferry was closed all week. eeerrrr. This plantation is one of America's most haunted plantations and is sooo beautiful. So we stayed in New Roads and after a few wrong turns here and there, (*wink*) we ate at a quaint little restaurant downtown. The food was great, just as good as Ma Mama's! ;)

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After eating, we strolled to a few flea/antique shops. We went to a thrift store and we came home with more bags of vintage goodies!

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And at the end of the day, we also went shopping in "Sarah's boutique". She is cleaning out her studio and will post many awesome things soon so if you need some supplies, check her out.

There are so many beautiful things about New Roads, LA to talk about but you can visit here to find out for yourself.

I will leave you with some of my favorite pictures of Sarah's little town in Plantation Country...

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Gotta love these slave quarters that are still standing...I'm sure they would tell lots of stories if they could.

EDIT: My wonderful son (studying to be a history teacher)  just left me a comment correcting my use of the term "slave quarters".  I am pasting it here for you to read...looks like my college dollars are going to good use!!!! {and I love the fact he reads my blog...}

STOP! A little correction needs to be made!
THOSE are not slave quarters. Those old homes are really old Louisiana share-cropper homes. They were probably built sometime after the Civil War and lived in up until WWII. Usually the house was built around the original plantation home that the land they farmed belonged to, but they were eventually moved into the countryside because many complained that it still looked like slavery was taking place in the area (which share-cropping was almost the same as slavery).
Normally, these homes stayed in the family. Generation after generation would live their entire life there farming the local fields. So mom, this is what a house would look like for your grandparents (my great grandparents) when they were growing up in pre-WWII time (1900-1940).
Slave houses were built in the most basic of ways being only a square home with one room usually. All of these homes have the french style inset porches and hip or double gradient roof styles. They have been modernized a little with the tin roof. Originally, they probably were built with wood panels.
But you are right. If these old homes could talk, they could tell some amazing stories.
Love you mom,
Brett

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This little town has beautiful majestic century old live oaks blanketed with dripping moss...

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but sometimes beauty pays a heavy price...

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Thanks Sarah, we had a wonderful day with you. Hope to see you again soon!!!

And thank you all for joining us in New Roads, LA.

Our series of "Wish you were here" will continue!!!! Stay tuned!!!!

15 comments:

Stacy's Shabby Shoppe said...

Jodie ~ sounds like a wonderful trip and I love the photographs! I've never been down to that part of the country ~ I'm missing out! ~Stacy~

Sue said...

The pictures are wonderful! This vacation of yours is the gift that keeps on giving. I can't wait to see and hear more!!

Sue

Alison Gibbs said...

Wow what a fun trip. Fabulous photos.
Alison

Tammy Fanara said...

I love the way you tell your story in pictures, I could almost feel the humidity and smell the mustiness of the antique shop.

Frippery said...

Jodie, How beautiful. I am a bit jealous. Looks like your travels with Sandy were wonderful. 1200 miles! Keep posting about your adventures. Hugs, Pam

Robin Thomas: A Nest With a View said...

I am enjoying this trip with ya'll and more than a little envious!

Brett said...

STOP! A little correction needs to be made!

THOSE are not slave quarters. Those old homes are really old Louisiana share-cropper homes. They were probably built sometime after the Civil War and lived in up until WWII. Usually the house was built around the original plantation home that the land they farmed belonged to, but they were eventually moved into the countryside because many complained that it still looked like slavery was taking place in the area (which share-cropping was almost the same as slavery).

Normally, these homes stayed in the family. Generation after generation would live their entire life there farming the local fields. So mom, this is what a house would look like for your grandparents (my great grandparents) when they were growing up in pre-WWII time (1900-1940).

Slave houses were built in the most basic of ways being only a square home with one room usualy. All of these homes have the french style inset porches and hip or double gradient roof styles. They have been modernized a little with the tin roof. Originally, they probably were built with wood panels.

But you are right. If these old homes could talk, they could tell some amazing stories.

Love you mom,
Brett

June said...

Wow Jodie, 1200 miles! That's a lot of loot. And a lot of beauty. I wish we were there too. What fun! I loved the correction your son sent you. I think it's great that he reads mom's blog. I love the pics of the (share-cropper's quarters)
So great to get all your comments today. I was thrilled. Thank you so much. Sure did miss you when you were gone.
Hugs, June

Marsha's Mpressions said...

Just stumbled upon your blog today. Your photos are beautiful!

The Victorian Parlor said...

I am lovin' the 'wish you were here' paper plate posts! This is so much fun! I enjoy finding small towns with lots of character and wonderful antiques shops. And the haunted mansion-I definately would have wanted to visit that! Your son's comments are great-I didn't know that about the small cottages. Thanks for the history lesson!!!

Can't wait to see more of this fun and wonderful week!

Blessings,

Kim

Saucy said...

It looks like a lovely outing, I think that letter from your learned son is funny!

Gypsy Mermaid said...

Hey chick! Ya didnt scare me away! hehe just wait to you really get to know me haha you going to be like omg this girl is nuts. I really didnt let it go! well have to share a few drinks then ill loosen up! haha but I am so glad you enjoyed my town. The stupid ferry is now open... blah. me and you need to get together one weekend and go! well call me or text me sometime! big hugs

toodles-
sarah

trash talk said...

That paper plate is sure getting around! (Get it? A Round?) Love the photos and the name of her little town. Was that one plantation on Ghost Hunters? I seem to remember seeing it. Isn't it a shame that all those houses can't be saved some how? Isn't there anybody out there who collects houses? Keep 'em coming...I can take it, even though I am pea green with envy.
Debbie

Debby said...

Enjoyed all the pics, looks like a fabulous vacation to me.
Debby

Stephenie said...

What a fun post..Such amazing pictures..Felt like I was on the trip with you..
I'm over here laughing about your son correcting you...My son does that to me all the time!!!!!How funny...
STephenie